Lick Observatory’s Automated Planet Finder: first robotic telescope for exoplanets

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Unlike Kepler, however, which focused on distant stars in one small patch of sky, the APF focuses on nearby stars and covers the entire sky. “The planetary systems we’re finding are our nearest neighbors. Those are the ones that will matter to future generations,” said Steve Vogt, professor of astronomy and astrophysics at UC Santa Cruz, who led the $12 million APF project and designed the Levy spectrometer at the heart of the system.

This new facility will lead the way to a census of exoplanets around nearby stars. Links to the first papers are given in this University of California/Lick Observatory press release.

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One Response to “Lick Observatory’s Automated Planet Finder: first robotic telescope for exoplanets”

  1. […] The Automated Planet Finder (APF) plays an important role in the discovery of two new “super-Earth” exoplanets in orbit […]

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