Orion in a new, submillimeter light

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Image credit: ESO/Digitized Sky Survey 2

This dramatic new image of cosmic clouds in the constellation of Orion reveals what seems to be a fiery ribbon in the sky. The large bright region at top is the familiar Orion Nebula, M42. This orange glow represents faint light coming from grains of cold interstellar dust, at wavelengths too long for human eyes to see. It was observed by the ESO-operated Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) in Chile.

Clouds of gas and interstellar dust are the raw materials from which stars are made. But these tiny dust grains block our view of what lies within and behind the clouds — at least at visible wavelengths — making it difficult to observe the processes of star formation. This is why astronomers need to use instruments that are able to see at other wavelengths of light. At submillimetre wavelengths, rather than blocking light, the dust grains shine due to their temperatures of a few tens of degrees above absolute zero. A cloud of dust with a temperature of only ten degrees Kelvin has its peak of emission at around 0.3 millimetres — in the part of the spectrum where APEX is very sensitive. The APEX telescope with its submillimetre-wavelength camera LABOCA, located at an altitude of 5000 metres above sea level on the Chajnantor Plateau in the Chilean Andes, is the ideal tool for this kind of observation. The dust clouds form beautiful filaments, sheets, and bubbles as a result of processes including gravitational collapse and the effects of stellar winds. These winds are streams of gas ejected from the atmospheres of stars, which are powerful enough to shape the surrounding clouds into the convoluted forms seen here.

The research paper is “A Herschel and APEX Census of the Reddest Sources in Orion: Searching for the Youngest Protostars” by A. Stutz et al., ApJ 767, 36 (2013) [ESO pdf]. For more on the young protostars in the Orion molecular cloud see here.

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One Response to “Orion in a new, submillimeter light”

  1. […] have looked at Orion in many recent posts. The Orion molecular cloud complex extends several degrees on the sky roughly centred on M42 and […]

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